Posts Tagged ‘writing’

Peep Show author interview with Andrea Dale

November 9, 2009

How did you come up with the idea for your story “Now You See Her” in Peep Show?

“Now You See Her” is a companion piece to my story “Come to My Window,” which appears in Where the Girls Are: Urban Lesbian Erotica (Cleis Press, 2009). The protagonist in “Come to My Window” is a naive small-town girl who moves to the big city (Montreal) to be an assistant to a sexy, confident, dominant woman. The woman introduces the girl to the city on many levels, including fucking her against a plate-glass window looking out over the city and telling her to imagine the people watching, enjoying, maybe taking pictures…

So when the call for submissions came for Peep Show, my first thought was, well, who IS watching? The answer was a couple who knows the woman, has met the girl, and who discovers they’re more voyeuristic than they realized…

Did the story change as you were writing it from your original conception of it?

Not really, no. I had it pretty much sussed out before I started writing. The little scenelet at the end wasn’t planned, but grew naturally from the writing and was a nice capper to the story, I thought.

What’s your favorite line or paragraph from your story?

Shane was taking picture after picture, glancing up from the camera every so often to just watch the action across the street. Emilie was spanking Katy, and while Katy’s hips jerked forward every time Emilie’s palm landed, they rolled in pleasure in between the blows. I doubted Katy was even aware she was doing it, and I wished we had a video camera as well.

Is your Peep Show story similar to or different from your usual erotic writing style?

I’d say it’s pretty similar. I had a stronger sense of the characters in my head than I usually do, but in a story this short, I can’t say that translated as much to the page.

What do you think is sexy about exhibitionism and/or voyeurism?

It’s all those fun words: Illicit. Naughty. Wicked. Forbidden, even. We’re taught that sex should be private–and in many occasions, that is how it should be. But it shouldn’t necessarily always be, and breaking free of “should” and “proper” is incredibly hot. With voyeurism, it’s fun to see what you can’t see while you’re having sex yourself…I actually like to see some close-up penetration shots in my porn! With exhibitionism, I think it’s sexiest when one person is a little too shy or embarrassed or reticent, and the other person “makes” them do it (because it’s what the shy person really wants, deep down!).

If you care to answer, are you more of a voyeur, exhibitionist, or neither? Do you think there’s something inherently exhibitionistic about writing, especially writing erotica?

Probably more of a voyeur myself. I love people watching, whether innocently or when I’m thinking “I wonder what he kisses like? I wonder what she looks like when she comes?” It’s part of being a writer–plus I’m being voyeuristic with each and every one of my characters!

For me, I don’t think writing is exhibitionistic. I’m writing about characters, not myself (even if there might be elements of myself), and I’m writing fiction (even if a detail or desire might come from my life). If someone asks me, with waggled eyebrows, whether I’ve done everything I’ve written about, I like to point out that I’ve never had sex with a vampire, a merman, or a shape-changing cat woman. Or, sadly, with a kinky rock star… Dammit!

What are you working on next?

It changes daily! I’ve got one novel in revision, one novel I’m finishing up, and there are at least three anthologies I’d like to submit stories to in the next month or so. As tempting as NaNoWriMo is, this year I’m just not in the right place to start a new novel! Maybe in December…

Andrea Dale’s (“Now You See Her”) stories have appeared in Do Not Disturb and Afternoon Delight, among many others. With coauthors, she has written A Little Night Music and Cat Scratch Fever. “Now You See Her” is a companion story to “Come to My Window,” in Where the Girls Are. More at www.cyvarwydd.com.

Below is an excerpt from “Now You See Her” by Andrea Dale. To read the whole story, check out Peep Show: Erotic Tales of Voyeurs and Exhibitionists. Read excerpts from all 18 stories in Peep Show by clicking here.

“Her main thing is exhibitionism. She likes to show off, likes to show off her partners. Likes to humiliate them a little bit, but not in a mean way.” I was having trouble thinking, between the aftereffects of the martinis and Shane’s skillful hands making my blood rush from my brain to pool in my groin. “Am I making any sense?”
“Oh, yes,” he said. “You definitely are. Keep talking.”

“Don’t want to,” I said, reaching for him.

He braceleted my wrist with his fingers, pulled me away. “Yes,” he said. “You’re enjoying this just as much as I am.”

I sighed, tried to focus through the haze of pleasure. “She likes to have sex in front of mirrors, to have her girlfriends watch themselves as they come. Or in a semipublic place, where someone might see. In front of a window. Nothing turns her on more than knowing her girlfriend is walking next to her in a short skirt and no panties when it’s breezy. She won’t let them reach down to catch the skirt when it fluffs up…”

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Peep Show author interview with Kissa Starling

October 29, 2009

How did you come up with the idea for your story “Busted” in Peep Show?

I have a wild imagination and I constantly think up story plots. Public displays of affection are sexy hot and I couldn’t resist the urge to submit something for this anthology. The back row of a deep, dark movie theater or hotel by the hour? The only difference I see is the audience and I loved writing about how both sides would react to blatant, in your face, public sexual interactions.

Did the story change as you were writing it from your original conception of it?

I had most of the plot mapped out in my head before I ever tarted typing. I’m sure I embellished once the words transferred to the computer screen but my original thoughts stayed pretty much intact.

What’s your favorite line or paragraph from your story?

Lydia squirmed around on the seat, trying to make sure no bare skin touched the fabric. They weren’t the first to play like this and they certainly wouldn’t be the last. The thought of what might be on the stadium seats made her shudder. I like this look into Lydia’s personality. She’s getting ready to “perform” in front of an audience full of movie watchers but she takes the time to think of other exhibitionists that came there before her. The shudder is actually kind of funny considering she’s preparing to do something similar to the crushed-velvet, theater seats.

Is your Peep Show story similar to or different from your usual erotic writing style?

I believe that readers will find this to be very similar to my usual erotic writing. A lot of my writing includes elements from the BDSM lifestyle. Voyeurism and exhibitionism are both rampant in dungeons all over the world where people practice the lifestyle so this wasn’t a huge stretch for me.

What do you think is sexy about exhibitionism and/or voyeurism?

Exhibitionism is the freeing of ones mind from the preconceived sexual moral notions most of us are brought up with. There’s nothing more exciting than looking up to find someone sharing a moment with you. Voyeurism is the flip side. Anyone who’s watched an X-rated movie or spied on another couple’s intimate moment is labeled a voyeur but what about those ‘people watchers’ out there? I know a lot of people who go to the mall or out to dinner with the sole purpose of ‘people watching.’ It’s a fun activity; I’ve done it myself. If those same people we love watching so much began kissing, groping or rubbing would we look away? Um, I can speak only for myself but of course not! Watching others gain pleasure from one another can bring the watcher his or her own pleasure and nothing is sexier than self pleasure.

If you care to answer, are you more of a voyeur, exhibitionist, or neither?

I definitely lean toward the exhibitionist end of the spectrum. I’m more of a get in the action type than a watcher but I can see the fun on both sides.

Do you think there’s something inherently exhibitionistic about writing, especially writing erotica?

There just may be. I mean it’s not like an author can deny knowing about certain sexual ideas or proclivities if he or she writes about them. We authors insert a little part of ourselves into every story we create. Writing is often a form of anonymous exhibitionism and it can be truly titillating!

What are you working on next?

I am currently working on the fourth book in the Lifestyle Series for Red Rose Publishing. Chalan’s Story is about a trainer and his pony. This is the first time I’ve written about the interesting fetish of pony play and I’ve learned so many things already. I hope to finish and submit it one before the end of the year.

I’m so glad to be a part of this anthology. Working with Cleis Press, and the famous Rachel Kramer Bussel, is fantastic! Learn more about me at www.kissastarling.com

Kissa Starling “Busted” (www.kissastarling.com) is a woman of many words. Her stories range from sweet to sizzling and everything in between. What started as a few words written in a diary has turned into a full-fledged writing career. She spends time each and every day dreaming up plots, researching settings, and dreaming up characters.

Below is an excerpt from “Busted” by Kissa Starling. To read the whole story, check out Peep Show: Erotic Tales of Voyeurs and Exhibitionists. Read excerpts from all 18 stories in Peep Show by clicking here.

“What are you wearing?” My man is such a perv. No wonder we get along so well.

“Everything that you requested. Why don’t you let me drive and then you can see what I’m wearing in person?” She laughed into the phone but Andy stayed silent. At times she wondered what she was doing with such a serious lover, but then she remembered the way he made her feel when he…

“Lydia. Are you there?”

“Yes, I’m here.” She squinted against the glare of the car traveling opposite her.

“Tell me what you’re wearing.” Lydia swerved to the right to avoid going over the yellow line.

“A short skirt…” So short that my ass peeks out.

“No panties, right?”

“Of course not. My black thin silk shirt…”

“No bra, right?” Why can’t I ever finish a sentence?

“No, Andy, no bra. Listen I have to drive.”

“Don’t hang up that phone.” Silence. “Tell me about your bush.”

“Again, just as you like it. I haven’t shaved in weeks.” Ten million men like bare pussy and I get an Indian guy who loves hair!

“Mmm. I can’t wait till you get here. You have me hot already. Now get off of that phone. You shouldn’t be talking and driving at the same time.” Just thinking of the night ahead spurred tingles throughout her body.

“Really? Well than maybe you shouldn’t be calling me. See you soon.”

Peep Show author interview with Angela Caperton

October 27, 2009

How did you come up with the idea for your story in Peep Show?

My partner Drake is fascinated by sexy popular culture from the mid 20th Century – pulp magazines, exploitation films, and pin-up art. He’s always sharing his finds with me, so when I saw the collection title, Peep Show, it was natural for me to try and write something set back in that “Golden Age” of pin-up art and photography. I imagined a girl, innocent of her own sexuality, seduced by the power of erotic imagery into taking some chances and exposing herself. From there, the story mostly wrote itself.

Did the story change as you were writing it from your original conception of it?

The twist at the end came to me while I was writing it. My original concept was more romantic.

What’s your favorite line or paragraph from your story?

Probably this one. I think I caught something of the essence of tease in it.

All the time, the other five men clicked intently, spellbound as she was, their cameras touching her, chasing the light along her curves, fondling her breasts and bringing the nipples to explosive sensitive peaks, molding the tight curve of her thighs and hips. She turned before them, showing her bare bottom, aware that if she bent only a little, they would see the spread lips of her treasure.

But she kept that from them.

Is your Peep Show story similar to or different from your usual erotic writing style?

I am slowly learning all the different voices I have inside me (did that sound psychotic?) but for the most part, I really write two kinds of story, mostly depending on whether I am writing for an erotic market or a romantic one. I love writing both kinds, but erotic stories are a little less bound by convention. “Calendar Girl” is similar to my other erotic work. I have a story coming up in the indie pulp mag Out of the Gutter that is, in some ways, the counterpoint to this story – more about voyeurism than exhibitionism.

What do you think is sexy about exhibitionism and/or voyeurism?

So many things…

I believe all writers and artists are voyeurs. We spend much of our time watching the world and interpreting it in our heads and hopefully in our work and turning the fantasies into words or art. Exhibitionism is at least in part about the promise of aesthetic fulfillment and, when we’re lucky, erotic fulfillment, as well. The standard belief is that men are more aroused by visual stimulation than women, but I know a lot of women – including myself – who are turned on by a good-looking guy or girl showing some skin and, of course, the perfect pairing may well be a voyeur who enjoys looking and an exhibitionist who enjoys showing off. It’s wonderful foreplay.

If you care to answer, are you more of a voyeur, exhibitionist, or neither? Do you think there’s something inherently exhibitionistic about writing, especially writing erotica?

I am probably more of an exhibitionist than a voyeur. Although I appreciate naked people and I am sometimes turned on by explicit visual erotica, it’s not something I pursue often. I have a little bit of experience with exhibitionism and it is a turn-on, but again, not something I have done often. And, sure, writing erotica is exhibitionistic though many of my characters do things I would never do. Of course, that doesn’t mean I won’t fantasize about them…

What are you working on next?

Several things. I love writing short stories for specific markets, including your books. I find the submission calls irresistible (make of that what you will!) and they stimulate me to think of stories that I might not ever write otherwise. I’m also working on a couple of pieces that would probably be best categorized as erotic horror. Finally, when other urges don’t compel me, I’m making good progress on a sequel to my Eppie-winning erotic fantasy, Woman of the Mountain. The sequel is called Woman of the Water and it’s more focused on dominance and submission than the first book. I’m having a lot of fun writing it.

See also: guest post “Visually Aroused” by Angela Caperton on Bettie Page and her story inspiration.

Born in Virginia and later raised on a sailboat, Angela Caperton (“Calendar Girl”) has traveled extensively and appreciates the world in all its forms. Her erotic fantasy, Woman of the Mountain, won the 2008 Eppie for Best Erotica, and she has short stories in Lust at First Bite and Girls on Top.

Below is an excerpt from “Calendar Girl” by Angela Caperton. To read the whole story, check out Peep Show: Erotic Tales of Voyeurs and Exhibitionists. Read excerpts from all 18 stories in Peep Show by clicking here.

Charlie appeared like a genie to take the roses and she stood and walked to the screen, her breath faster and the line between her legs sodden and dripping. Desi paused beside the screen, looking at the lurid curtains and the sofa, like something in a sultan’s harem. She thought of the Arabian Nights and the woman who kept herself alive by telling stories, by enchanting a man with her talents.

She thought of April and her nipples tightened.

She shed her blouse, camisole and bra without hesitation, and before she put the blouse back on, she looked at the costumes on hangers behind the screen. Some of the shining fantasies were no bigger than her hand, and her nipples grew as hard as marbles as she imagined herself in glossy black and white, shining patches of satin. She stole a glimpse of herself in the mirror, unable to look directly at her image, the rising curves with dark rigid tips, and her face that of the woman in Bobby’s photos.

She slipped on the sheer blouse and buttoned it to the place Mr. Bentley had asked for, aware of every place the linen touched her, its cling no more than mist, but intense as a warm finger. She stepped from behind the screen, her blood pulsing in her ears, her throat, and her treasure. Almost giddy, she walked toward the men and their cameras.

Peep Show author interview with Nobilis Reed

October 21, 2009

How did you come up with the idea for your story, “Glass,” in Peep Show?

The story started life as the first segment, all by itself, an inspiration that drew from my job during college as a security guard. Part of my job included manning a camera bank and making recordings of anything I saw that would be of interest to my employers, basically anything illegal or unethical. There was a good deal of debate on the security team about what that actually meant and what we should be recording.

Ever since then I’ve had little fantasies dancing around in the back of my mind.

Did the story change as you were writing it from your original conception of it?

I dislike stories that don’t have some kind of twist in them, and I tend to avoid writing stories that have a clear-cut “victim.” Those two influences, together, guided my efforts in completing the story. Once the inspiration dawned, writing the rest of the rough draft was fairly simple. The fact that I could add in a little meta-voyeurism was a bonus.

What’s your favorite line or paragraph from your story?

The last one, which unfortunately I can’t reproduce here without spoiling the story!

Is your Peep Show story similar to or different from your usual erotic writing style?

Usually I write more “speculative” fiction, that is, science fiction or fantasy. I probably could have set this story in a “total information awareness” society but it wasn’t really necessary. In retrospect it’s probably a better story for having left that element out. The focus on the thoughts and feelings of the characters involved is very much my style, however. Aside from the speculative elements I don’t believe this story is much different from what I usually write.

What do you think is sexy about exhibitionism and/or voyeurism?

For the exhibitionist, there’s a kind of validation to it. “If a complete stranger likes me like this, then I must be really hot/macho/whatever!”

For the voyeur, it’s more like “This person is putting on a show just for me!”

If you care to answer, are you more of a voyeur, exhibitionist, or neither?

Both. I’m not paraphiliac about it — I don’t need to be engaging in it to get off — but there’s definitely a charge for me both in being watched, and in watching. The “shower scenes” from the movies Porky’s and Private School were some of the first times I saw naked bodies on screen!

Do you think there’s something inherently exhibitionistic about writing, especially writing erotica?

And yes, there’s definitely an exhibitionist quality to writing and publishing erotica. One of the most fulfilling qualities about it is putting aspects of my own sexuality (fictionalized and disguised, of course) out for public consumption, and having them accepted, praised, and even rewarded. It’s an incredible rush!

What are you working on next?

Currently, I’m writing the outline for my second novel, Pirates, while I gear up for the publication of my first novel, Scout, which will be coming out in mid-2010 from Logical Lust.

Nobilis Reed (”Glass”) takes care of his disabled wife, teenage kids, and too many cats, occasionally taking flights of erotic fancy that then become enmeshed in his brain until writing exorcises them. His career in smut has so far produced four novellas, which you can find at www.nobiliserotica.com.

Below is an excerpt from “Glass” by Nobilis Reed. To read the whole story, check out Peep Show: Erotic Tales of Voyeurs and Exhibitionists. Read excerpts from all 18 stories in Peep Show by clicking here.

The glass dildo, this time. Yes, definitely the glass. Mira unlocked the bottom drawer and selected the hard transparent shape from the jumble of torpedoes and plastic phalluses and laid it on the desk in front of her.

A gentle curve, a pleasant shade of blue, a few tiny bubbles trapped inside: it could almost pass for a work of art. She smiled at the thought of just leaving it on the shelf alongside the walkie-talkie and the heavy ring of keys. Would anyone say anything? She doubted it.

The couple on her monitor stopped kissing and pulled at each other’s clothes. Mira looked up. It wouldn’t be long now, but where was that damned lube? Bit by bit, their bodies came into view. They were beautiful, both of them. Every Friday they showed up, performed their pas de deux, and left again. She had invented a hundred stories to explain their presence in the depths of the darkened parking garage. Not for the first time, she thanked the nameless engineer who’d invented night-vision video cameras.

She leaned back in her chair, pulled open two buttons of her blouse, and moved one hand into the gap.

Peep Show author interview with M. March

October 20, 2009

This is the first of several Q&As, conducted via email, with contributors to Peep Show: Erotic Tales of Voyeurs and Exhibitionists.

M. March

How did you come up with the idea for your story “Missing Michael” in Peep Show?

This story, “Missing Michael,” was actually from an old novel I was working on. The whole novel was written from the point of view of a gay man, but I chickened out with finishing that novel and decided it was better to write a new novel written from the point of view of someone more like me, i.e., a lesbian. But I had saved the old novel because I really liked parts of it and thought I could salvage it eventually in one form or another. So the story in Peep Show started with the first paragraph of the first page of that old novel, but then I rewrote it so much, it bares no resemblance to that old novel at all.

Did the story change as you were writing it from your original conception of it?

Like I said, I originally planned for this to be a rewrite of that old novel, so that definitely changed. It’s kind of difficult to remember, as I wrote it so long ago, but I don’t think I had multiple viewpoints in the original conception.

What’s your favorite line or paragraph from your story?

“I’ll eat his ass like it’s a seven-course meal and suck his nipples like they’re a cold milkshake.”

Is your Peep Show story similar to or different from your usual erotic writing style?

Definitely different. I never wrote a gay erotic short story before and it seems odd that I would, considering I’m a lesbian. But there’s a part of me that can understand the beauty in men, especially queer men, and also a part of me that feels mentally like I am a gay man. Also, I had some experience in my life being in a heterosexual relationship, so I do understand the sexual appeal of a male, and the sexual experience of being with a male.

The multiple viewpoints is also different than how I usually write, and this story is much more poignant than I usually write. I tend to write funnier erotic stories. For me, I think I was trying to write about a breakup I had, which to me felt like a death, and writing about how you move on from that.

What do you think is sexy about exhibitionism and/or voyeurism?

That’s a good question. I think there’s something sexy about having sex where you could be caught, but likely won’t be. (Because I’ve been caught almost having sex once, and trust me, that wasn’t fun at all.) Like if you’re in a hotel room and you stare out the window, and you can see all these people below you, but they can’t see that you are 10 floors up having sex. It’s almost like you’re having an orgy, because these other people are sort of involved in your sex scene. I got a few hand jobs in clubs and it was done very discreetly, but I got such a high, thinking, “I’m doing this and all these people are watching me, but they don’t realize it.” I’m not even sure I can put it into words why it’s exciting, but it is.

Voyeurism is not really my bag, though I will admit I like some films where people are having sex. And it’s kind of cool in the summertime when my female neighbor decides not to bother with a shirt.

If you care to answer, are you more of a voyeur, exhibitionist, or neither? Do you think there’s something inherently exhibitionistic about writing, especially writing erotica?

I’m more of an exhibitionist, as my last answer illustrates. And I think there is something exhibitionistic about writing fiction, regardless of genre. Although fiction is not true, everyone assumes that what you write is based on your personal life. And with erotica, people think God knows what kind of sex life you have. I am very private about what I tell people, but with my writing I let it all hang out, because I love writing, and to hold back exposing myself in my writing would not serve my writing well at all. It can be exciting being that exhibitionistic in writing. There’s a thrill, very similar to the thrill you get being sexual in public. It’s exciting to release a guarded part of yourself, very freeing.

What are you working on next?

I have a big Excel sheet with all kinds of deadlines I may or may not ever get to, but I really do hope to have a first draft of my novel written within a year. I signed up with NanoWriMo so I can get going on that. I am also contemplating a creative writing MFA, which I have been contemplating ever since I got the BA.

M. March (”Missing Michael”) is the pseudonym of a writer who has contributed to the New York Post, AfterEllen, AfterElton, Gay City News, Blacktable.com, Self, Complete Woman, Time Out New York, First-Timers and Spanked: Red-Cheeked Erotica. Nonerotica interests include watching cult movies, browsing in bookstores, drinking strong coffee and listening to obscure disco.

Below is an excerpt from “Missing Michael” by M. March. Read the whole story in Peep Show: Erotic Tales of Voyeurs and Exhibitionists. Read excerpts from all 18 Peep Show stories here.

I’ve just gotten a monster erection.

It happened when Gym Boy took off his shirt. I got this terrible craving to pinch his hard, red nipples and then my dick got huge, swollen beyond belief. I was scared someone would notice it, so I went into the bathroom to take care of myself.

And now as I touch my cock, I can’t help but see Gym Boy in swimming trunks. He is kissing me and sticking a finger up my ass and covering my prick with his mouth and I am getting so hard and I am screaming and stroking myself so fast I may have a heart attack. A part of me hopes I will. I need to see Michael again.

Oh God, this feels so good. No, not just good; I am mad with pleasure. I feel like strutting around the gym–no, all of New York–with my giant cock out for every man to see and suck.

I spy a hole in the wall and think it’s the perfect size, and before I realize how ridiculous it is, I’m putting my dick in there, and thrusting my hips, and smacking my bare ass. I am not thinking about moving out of our house. I am not worrying about how to turn down that great guy my sister wants me to date; I am not wondering how I will manage to visit my husband’s grave without having yet another nervous breakdown.

All I am doing is thinking of Gym Boy.